The Brancatelli File for 2019
WHAT TO KNOW ABOUT JOE
Joe Brancatelli is a publication consultant, which means that he helps media companies start, fix and reposition newspapers, magazines and Web sites. He is also the former executive editor of Frequent Flyer magazine and has been a consultant to or columnist for more business-travel and leisure-travel publishing operations than he can remember. He began his career as a business reporter and created JoeSentMe.com in the dark days after 9/11 while stranded in a hotel room in San Francisco. He lives on the Hudson River in Cold Spring, New York.


February 7: BRINGING JFK INTO THE 21ST-CENTURY. AGAIN. AND AGAIN.
New York politicians keep promising to bring Kennedy Airport into the 21st century. But it seems mired in the middle of the 20th. Billions are being spent, plans are being laid, airlines and terminals are being moved, but Kennedy isn't likely to make it into the 21st Century until sometime in the 22nd.

January 31: TRAVEL VORTICES, POLAR AND POLITICAL
Life on the road has come at us cold, hard and fast so far this year. I don't know what to talk about first, the polar vortex that made it difficult to fly this week or the political vortex that made airports a mess this month. But we need to discuss both.

January 24: NOBODY ASKED ME, BUT ...
Why is British Airways painting old planes in old livery? To cover up its old business class seats, I presume. Meanwhile, Delta's boss wants to make travel "magic." He wouldn't know magic if a magician gave him a magic wand in the Magic Kingdom. Yup, it's time for some travel snark.

January 10: TWO WEEKS IN ANOTHER TOWN
No one ever confused this bald lump of scribe with Kirk Douglas, but my jaw has been clenching and my chin clefting over these past two weeks in another town. But you learn stuff about life and life on the road being gone that long. Here's what I've learned these last two weeks.

January 1: HOW THE SHUTDOWN AFFECTED TRAVEL
When the "partial" government shutdown began on December 22, 2018, most observers expected it to be short. It dragged on for 35 days, the longest in U.S. history. While the shutdown was partial, it had a disproportionate effect on travel. The TSA was hit, meaning airport security screeners were asked to work without pay. Ditto air traffic controllers--and, in the end, a shortage of controllers helped lead to the end of the shutdown. The FAA also ran in gray mode, which meant aircraft and airports weren't inspected. The National Transportation Safety Board was also shut. Here is how we covered it.

These columns originally appeared at JoeSentMe.com.

Copyright 1993-2019 by Joe Brancatelli. All rights reserved.